George A Romero's Dawn of the Dead

Dawn of the Dead

Dawn of the Dead

Dawn of the Dead

Dawn of the Dead

If you are new to the zombie sub-genre, and think that the recent DAWN OF THE DEAD (2004, d. Zack Snyder) was good, then you really need to see the original version as well. Made in 1978, George Romero's DAWN OF THE DEAD was a sequel to his own NIGHT OF THE LIVING DEAD, made 10 years earlier, and it inspired a whole generation of gory zombie films. He followed it up with DAY OF THE DEAD in 1985, but it was in Italy that the most interesting variations were produced, starting with Lucio Fulci's ZOMBIE FLESHEATERS in 1979. Italian horror maestro Dario Argento produced DAWN OF THE DEAD and collaborated on the soundtrack with elecro/prog-rockers Goblin.

DAWN OF THE DEAD depicts a National Emergency situation gripping the US as the zombie population grows at an inexplicable and alarming rate; they eat human flesh, and the people that they kill become zombies themselves. Two Philadelphia Police S.W.A.T. officers, a helicopter pilot and his TV reporter girlfriend escape the city and take refuge in an abandoned, suburban shopping mall after securing it following a series of brutal confrontations with the undead (gory special effects provided by Tom Savini). Their survival is threatened when a marauding private army of bikers leave a door open once more allowing the zombies access to the mall that they crave for, even after death.

The film can be seen both as a powerful apocalyptic critique on American consumer society, and a fast moving gory action film, with moments of great suspense and comedy. The combination of a S.W.A.T. team, thousands of zombies and an army of bikers are guaranteed to keep you at the edge of your seat for the duration of the movie. And if that isn't enough, Savini provides a multitude of unpleasant deaths; we see heads sheared by machetes and helicopter rotor blades, or blown to bits by bullets, limbs are amputated and, in true zombie/cannibal style, intestines are greedily devoured.

This DVD features the uncut director's version of the film presented in its original widescreen format.

Essential viewing.

Original promotional photographs here.

Features

Anamorphic 16:9 widescreen presentation
A brand new 75m documentary "The Dead Will Walk"
Audio commentary by director George A. Romero, special effects artist Tom Savini and assistant director Chris Romero Audio commentary by producer Richard P. Rubenstein
B biographies (Gaylen Ross, David Emge, Ken Foree, Scott H. Reiniger and George A. Romero)
Photo gallery
Theatrical trailers
Radio spots
Original reviews
Dolby 2.0 and optional Dolby 5.1 audio
Scene selection